Something to bark about...Copy Cats!

June 21, 2019 5 min read 9 Comments

Something to bark about...Copy Cats!

I bet a lot of you saw this article in the New York Times the other day about  Carolina Herrera, her muy muy Mexicana resort 2020 collection and the resulting accusation by the Mexican government of cultural appropriation. If you missed it you should go back and read it. It’s thought provoking. I have been chasing my tail over this particular brand of copycatting all week. I could go on and on and on about intellectual property and the number of times we have been knocked off and the pervasiveness of design theft in our industry, etc etc but I will save that for another day.

Let’s stick with the cultural appropriation vs. inspiration theme and the rampant use of Mexican folk art and motifs in the design world. God knows there couldn’t be a design house in the universe, from  Zara to  J.Crew to  Isabel Marant that hasn’t come out with their version of a “Mexican peasant blouse." Then there is the pervasive adoption of the iconic Otomi pattern.  I’m going to focus mainly on that for simplicity. (And because we do a version, too)
Otomi Shade on the Hunter Table Lamp
{The Hunter Glass Table Lamp with Pink Otomi Shade}
As longtime lovers of the fantastic embroidered textiles, we decided, in 2010 or so, to incorporate the Otomi fabric into our line by fashioning them into lamp shades. This was a big decision back then because we knew it would be time consuming and expensive and we would have to educate our audience on the amount of work involved, the history of the design, etc. We made a concerted effort (including an arduous trek on winding dirt roads through the Sierra Nevada Mountains to source production) to ensure that the Otomi people would directly profit from their creativity and handiwork. We launched it at the Atlanta Market,  and it was an immediate hit. But, honestly, it was not a cake walk. Working with the indigenous can be challenging. We had a good bit of trouble fulfilling orders at first. We received an entire shipment of fabric panels embroidered in the wrong colors. It seems our suppliers (lovely Otomi ladies met in the aforementioned trek) decided that the colors they sent were prettier than those we chose and requested. Ha! But we persevered and the Otomi lighting has been a fan favorite for years. And I am 100% comfortable with the inclusion of the Otomi’s heritage identity in our line. I feel like we did it the right way by promoting and celebrating their art while providing jobs and income.
Otomi Floor Lamp

And we sure are not alone. There are numerous retailers out there now with that exact business model. Instead of borrowing a cultural design, they are going directly to the communities working with the artisans and providing a sales channel for their traditional craft along with economic growth. And, in many cases, helping the artisans tweak their creations to appeal to a wider audience.

Hermes, as I understand it, collaborated with Otomi artisans for a line of scarves a few years back.  St. Frank seems to do a nice job of ethically sourcing and promoting craft worldwide, including Otomi textiles. Both  El Camino de Los Altos and  Pippa Holt Kaftans do a beautiful job of bringing traditional back strap woven textiles from Oaxaca and Chiapas to market.  Mi Golondrina is another great example of this business type.

But what about that gazillions of merchants to be found on the interwebs promoting their Otomi this or Otomi that? Honestly, you can’t turn a corner these days without seeing a rendition of the very distinctive and fantastic “magical animals” pattern splashed on some product or another.

Truly. It’s everywhere.

Take a gander at just a few found when you Google Otomi...

Mara Hoffman Dress

{Mara Hoffman dress. Photo via Honestly WTF.}

 

Boden Otomi Swimsuit

{Boden swimsuit. Photo via Boden.}

 

Katie Kime Melamine Plate

{Katie Kime melamine plate. Photo via Katie Kime.}

Ethan Allen Otomi Print

{Ethan Allen wall print. Photo via Ethan Allen.}

 

RH Crib Bedding

{Restoration Hardware crib bedding. Photo via RH.}

Hygge and West Otomi Wallpaper

{Hygee & West wallpaper artistry fabric. Photo via Hygge & West.}


And that is just the tip of the Otomi iceberg. So what is that?Is that design theft? Or cultural appropriation? Or is it just enthusiasm and appreciation of cultural creativity and craftsmanship? When is it ok to “draw inspiration” from an ethnic group’s art and when is it not? Especially in today’s weirdly insular and nationalistic political environment, I think it is crucial to celebrate and highlight cultural diversity and exchange. But when is it too close? 

Mostly these vendors seem to either call their patterns “Otomi” or reference the Otomi in their product descriptions so they are acknowledging their design source. And clearly many of the goods cloaked in the Otomi riff could never have been produced by the actual creators. You couldn’t go to Tenago de Doria and ask the ladies to hand embroider your plastic cell phone covers or your wallpaper or you melamine plates, etc etc. But what is the right thing to do in that situation? Is it ok to take the pattern as long as you use it in a different application? Who gets to decide that? And, if not, is there a way to fairly compensate the originator of a culturally emblematic style? Heaven knows these artisanal communities, and the Otomi in particular, are struggling and any sort of financial restitution would be hugely meaningful.

And what about those powerhouse vendors that "borrow" the design and trot off to China or where ever and have their bedding or clothing embroidered in factories? Is that really ok? I'm quite sure it's a whole lot easier logistically and far more profitable. I get that, as I mentioned earlier, going to the source can be cumbersome. But surely it's not nice to poach a people's cultural identity, have it mass produced and then pocket the cash?

And that brings me to a bigger question. Did any of these umpteen purveyors of “inspired” goods even consider reciprocating? Did design theft or cultural appropriation ever even cross their minds? I kind of doubt it. I bet a huge percentage of them didn’t even think about it. Maybe that is what it boils down to...we all need to be more thoughtful.

 

Copy Cat Otomi Floor Lamp

I will leave you with a personal and, in my opinion, completely unambiguous example. This pic was taken by my observant friend, Kate, in  The Monaco hotel in Pittsburg, a couple years back. As you can see, it has a screen printed version of our Otomi shade, a tripod gold iron base and even my goofy berry finial! Holy "inspiration"! It would have been awfully nice had they bought from the designer/creator rather than ripping us off...we could sure use the business and so could our lovely Otomi artisans. I guess the people at the Kimpton Hotels are too busy counting their money to think about ethically sourcing. Copy Cats!

 

Thanks for reading! Let's keep this conversation going in the comments below. For making it all the way to the end of this lengthy and informative blog post, we are offering 25% off out Pato and Paulina Otomi Pendants! Use code OTOMI25 at checkout. Code good until Sunday, June 23rd at Midnight.


9 Responses

Mary
Mary

July 09, 2019

Love your products. My daughter told me about your company with the words, “you’ll love this stuff, Mom. Looks like you”. She was right! Nothing beats the authentic Otomi.

jane gray pritchard
jane gray pritchard

June 24, 2019

Thank you, to all, so much for taking the time to read and respond. I really appreciate your comments and input.I cannot tell you how much I struggled with this blog. I find the whole issue so conflicting and troubling. And, AY, thank you for sharing your impressions of my glaringly inadequate writing skills. Seriously..i really cannot thank you enough for pointing that out to me. Of course I was not trying to be condescending and I am so sorry if I sounded that way. When i referred to the very talented Otomi artisans as indigenous (which I am sure did sound clumsy, flippant and off-putting) it was because they are actually a native people or group of Mexico. They have their own language, region, and obviously, artwork. In other, words, we work with lots of wonderful and talented Mexican artisans but not all of them are indigenous, as the Otomi are. And as to the colors…yes, I positively agree that their color vision is far superior to mine(not to mention, their imagination, creativity, and sewing skills). However, we had gone to their village to work directly with the artisans and picked out a set number of solid colors that we would use in our line.They gave us the names of the colors we had chosen and we set up a color chart with them for ordering so that there would be no confusion. Thus our surprise at receiving alternate colors in our first shipment. The colors they sent were , indeed, lovely. But they were not the colors we had photographed for our catalog or sold to our clients at the Atlanta market and, therefore, we could not ship them. As their beautiful work is so intricate and labor intensive the turn around on a good sized order is 3 months or so. Our clients were very understanding, for the most part, and waited patiently for their orders. And , while we were a bit horrified and embarrassed about our inability to fulfill our market orders(and a little distressed by the costs incurred) we were pretty tickled by their (the artisans) explanation for the colors sent.
So…I hope that clarifies my poorly attempted implication, somewhat. I am so sorry I made you cringe but really grateful that you brought it to my attention.
And thank you for being a lovely and long time client!

David Moore
David Moore

June 24, 2019

Love you, Jane!

erin metz
erin metz

June 24, 2019

This bothers me so much. I so appreciate your artisans and what they do with their hands . Their culture is so rich and they are so willing to work hard.
This is the society that we live in now. I see it every day on the internet. Ugh!

RB
RB

June 24, 2019

Thank you for the enlightenment!!! As we all love to save a dollar, celebrating and acknowledging someone’s talent and gifts would add to the uniqueness of the product. There is a price for authenticity. As there should be. So appreciate your company ethics!

Nan
Nan

June 24, 2019

As a huge fan of yours and going way back to Worlds Away, does that date me? You were one of the very first to use Otomi fabrics for your gorgeous
lampshades. Everything you do captures my attention and my heart. There may be copy cats “trying” to produce your look, but when you are the best, they all fall short.

REMEMBER: “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”

Jeanne
Jeanne

June 24, 2019

Every word written rings true. I love your art and hope one day to visit you in Chattanooga!

AY
AY

June 24, 2019

Yeeouch. I think you might want to reconsider the way you describe working with “the indigenous” (describing these skilled artisans that way, a as a category, seems pretty demeaning) and then immediately describing them as women who have bad taste in colorways is pretty off-putting. This whole post came across as surprisingly condescending, and I can tell that’s not your intent. (As a further aside, they’re the originating artisans, so I think there’s a pretty sound argument that their vision of complementary colors might trump yours…yikes.) I’ve bought your fixtures for many years now, and I cringed a fair amount as I read this. I felt like you should know that it’s not coming across quite how you intend.

Robert Gentry
Robert Gentry

June 24, 2019

great content
great read
cheers

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